"Millennials represent “the biggest gap between cultures in our history,” Craig LaRosa, a principal in the Newton, Mass.-based consulting firm Continuum"

— Seven tips for attracting Millennials

(Source: nrn.com)

"What they do buy into is the rare — trendy service-based businesses (bars and restaurants) and luxury goods (think Apple, Bose, Versace) are now booming. For example, Millennials eat out an average of 3.39 times per week, compared to 2.54 for Gen X and 2.34 for Boomers. So how can your company cater to these buying habits?"

5 tips for selling to the new power generation

(Source: venturebeat.com)

"They have turned to cooking to create experiences that they may have paid for in a restaurant in a different economic landscape. They are open to less expensive beauty products and feel that these products can work as well as costlier options. They have adopted a very self-reliant approach to healthcare and are generally trying to eat better to live healthier."

— Millennial Shoppers: Tapping Into the Next Growth Segment

(Source: supermarketnews.com)

Millennials Driving Alcoholic Beverage Trends

Millennials Driving Alcoholic Beverage Trends

"Later, we talked about the exchanges, and she explained that she saw e-mail as something for “old people.” It’s too slow for her, and the messages too long. Sometimes, she said, as with a Facebook status update, you don’t even need to respond at all."

- Disruptions: Life’s Too Short for So Much E-Mail

This author’s cousin seems to agree with our live focus group participants.

(Source: The New York Times)

Cities grow more than suburbs, first time in 100 years

Jaclyn King, 28, smiles as she arrives at her job at a Denver hospital on Wednesday. King grew up in the suburbs of Denver and now lives in the city and says she’ll never return to the suburbs because she wants to avoid the long commutes her parents had.

Cities grow more than suburbs, first time in 100 years

Jaclyn King, 28, smiles as she arrives at her job at a Denver hospital on Wednesday. King grew up in the suburbs of Denver and now lives in the city and says she’ll never return to the suburbs because she wants to avoid the long commutes her parents had.

"

Megan Silsby earned a biology degree last month from Virginia Tech, and she considers herself a full-time worker even though she hasn’t landed a job in this rough economy.

Every day at 8 a.m., Silsby, 22, heads to a basement office in her parents’ home in Chantilly, Va. All day, she searches the Internet for openings, applies for jobs, follows up with phone calls. She’s applied for more than 80 jobs, with no luck so far.

"

— A new ‘depression generation’ emerges, Millennials find economy forces frugal pragmatism

(Source: delawareonline.com)