What better way to end our first day at Millennial Mega Mashup then with a first person story illustrating so much of what we’ve heard today?
Where we spent much of the day sharing (admittedly fascinating) statistics and doing a bit of looking outside in, Malín Alegría brought us inside the Hispanic Millennial experience. “I was too dark to be American and too gringa to be Mexican” she said, speaking of growing up a third generation Hispanic in the U.S.
Her mission now? To be a culture ambassador. To encourage teens to step out of their comfort zones by reflecting their experiences back to them in YA literature (such as her new series Border Town, pictured here). The Latino community is diverse and a huge (and growing) part of the American experience and culturally competent expert voices are needed in the conversation.

What better way to end our first day at Millennial Mega Mashup then with a first person story illustrating so much of what we’ve heard today?

Where we spent much of the day sharing (admittedly fascinating) statistics and doing a bit of looking outside in, Malín Alegría brought us inside the Hispanic Millennial experience. “I was too dark to be American and too gringa to be Mexican” she said, speaking of growing up a third generation Hispanic in the U.S.

Her mission now? To be a culture ambassador. To encourage teens to step out of their comfort zones by reflecting their experiences back to them in YA literature (such as her new series Border Town, pictured here). The Latino community is diverse and a huge (and growing) part of the American experience and culturally competent expert voices are needed in the conversation.

The afternoon sessions at Millennial Mega Mashup started with “Death of the Hispanic Adult Demo as We Know It” with Hiram Enriquez, Director of Digital Media, Tr3s, Viacom International Media Networks and Nancy Tellet, Senior Vice President, Research, Viacom International Media Networks.
MTV Tr3́s echoed this morning’s quote “Just because it worked for the last generation, doesn’t mean it will for this one," pointing out a number of ways that the current MTV3 consumer is different from previous generations. Tr3s has found a number of ways that the 18-29 year old Hispanic demographic has a number of similarities with former generations such as:
Importance of family
72% of 2nd generation Hispanic millennials live at home
"The Trinity: Family, Music & La Comida" continues to be incredibly important (3 of 3 rated these aspects of life highly)
Traditional courtship is still valued over online dating
But some aspects are also changing, such as:
"A little spoiled, but they like it," - Millennials express a pleasure in being able to have the luxury of an easy life
Class hierarchy is lessening
Millennials are adopting more open attitudes towards dating, marriage and family, and trending towards getting married or becoming parents later then earlier generations.

The afternoon sessions at Millennial Mega Mashup started with “Death of the Hispanic Adult Demo as We Know It” with Hiram Enriquez, Director of Digital Media, Tr3s, Viacom International Media Networks and Nancy Tellet, Senior Vice President, Research, Viacom International Media Networks.

MTV Tr3́s echoed this morning’s quote “Just because it worked for the last generation, doesn’t mean it will for this one," pointing out a number of ways that the current MTV3 consumer is different from previous generations. Tr3s has found a number of ways that the 18-29 year old Hispanic demographic has a number of similarities with former generations such as:

Importance of family

72% of 2nd generation Hispanic millennials live at home

"The Trinity: Family, Music & La Comida" continues to be incredibly important (3 of 3 rated these aspects of life highly)

Traditional courtship is still valued over online dating

But some aspects are also changing, such as:

"A little spoiled, but they like it," - Millennials express a pleasure in being able to have the luxury of an easy life

Class hierarchy is lessening

Millennials are adopting more open attitudes towards dating, marriage and family, and trending towards getting married or becoming parents later then earlier generations.

"The old models of research really aren’t working anymore"

Karen L. Scherbaum, Vice President, Consumer Insights & Strategy of Macy’s and Aaron Reid, Ph.D., Founder and Chief Behavioral Scientist, Sentient Decision Science presented The Future Latina Market: Debunking Stereotypes in the Millennial Melting Pot. Macy’s was looking to really “click” with the Latina consumer and develop a relationship where they would recommend the brand.

Their presentation was about “digging beneath the surface” to break through the can’t say/won’t say problem in market research. Consumers may not be willing to share how they really feel, or may not be able to as they may not be aware of it.

One way that Sentient Decision Science went beyond asking about value was by  presenting trade off scenarios with examples of different purchases at different prices.

Other takeaways:

Just because it worked for the last generation, doesn’t mean it will for this one

Sometimes your hunches are right, but sometimes they aren’t. Don’t let preconceived notions cloud ability to adapt

Don’t take everything at face value: innovative techniques can get behind the immediate answer.

Alexander Goldstein of elwiri, a Spanish-language only app awed the audience at Millennial Mega Mashup with some serious stats:
45% of Hispanics own smartphones, with 27.4% owning Android and 20.9 iPhone.
Hispanic Millennials have 10x more friends on average then the rest of the population on social media
79% of social media within the Hispanic segment is on Facebook
Hispanic Millennials are 37% more likely to publish a blog, 12% more likely to visit other blogs
These statistics, combined with a retro-acculturation phenomenon that sees Hispanic culture and the Spanish language gaining a “cool” factor means that brands have a huge opportunity to reach the Hispanic market on a local, personal level. Delivering Spanish-Language messaging and finding brand ambassadors are two ways to jump into this space.

Alexander Goldstein of elwiri, a Spanish-language only app awed the audience at Millennial Mega Mashup with some serious stats:

45% of Hispanics own smartphones, with 27.4% owning Android and 20.9 iPhone.

Hispanic Millennials have 10x more friends on average then the rest of the population on social media

79% of social media within the Hispanic segment is on Facebook

Hispanic Millennials are 37% more likely to publish a blog, 12% more likely to visit other blogs

These statistics, combined with a retro-acculturation phenomenon that sees Hispanic culture and the Spanish language gaining a “cool” factor means that brands have a huge opportunity to reach the Hispanic market on a local, personal level. Delivering Spanish-Language messaging and finding brand ambassadors are two ways to jump into this space.

Our Hispanic Immersion workshop at Millennial Mega Mashup just kicked off with Patricia Shibata, Vice President, Multicultural Practice Lead, McCann Worldgroup.
Some key takeaways from this session were:
Hispanic Millennial Moms are “Millennial Moms” first and then “Hispanic,” cultural differences exist, but in many parts of the McCann study there was no significant difference between the groups.
Technology is good, but it can also be evil. The Hispanic millennial mom feels that her smartphone makes her have “superpowers” - it saves time and can be used as a “personal shopper.” 7 of 10 Hispanic millennial moms agree that technology makes her a better mother. However, many worry about technology detracting from family time.
Hispanic Millennial Moms are Brand Loyal: Hispanic Millennial Moms enjoy shopping for name brands and following trends for themselves and their families. 18% of Millennial Moms identify as “very brand loyal,” and Johnson & Johnson, Disney, P&G, General Mills, Kellogg’s & Nestle all score well for top of mind awareness amongst Hispanics.
Hispanic Millennial Moms are motivated to share for good with other parents and into the world via social media. 46% of hispanic millennial moms want to share good ideas or advice with as large of a community as possible.
However, for advice and information, Hispanic millennial moms mainly turn to family members. 53% looks to her mother and other female family members, 52% to doctors or healthcare professionals and  29% to other moms she is friends with.

Our Hispanic Immersion workshop at Millennial Mega Mashup just kicked off with Patricia Shibata, Vice President, Multicultural Practice Lead, McCann Worldgroup.

Some key takeaways from this session were:

Hispanic Millennial Moms are “Millennial Moms” first and then “Hispanic,” cultural differences exist, but in many parts of the McCann study there was no significant difference between the groups.

Technology is good, but it can also be evil. The Hispanic millennial mom feels that her smartphone makes her have “superpowers” - it saves time and can be used as a “personal shopper.” 7 of 10 Hispanic millennial moms agree that technology makes her a better mother. However, many worry about technology detracting from family time.

Hispanic Millennial Moms are Brand Loyal: Hispanic Millennial Moms enjoy shopping for name brands and following trends for themselves and their families. 18% of Millennial Moms identify as “very brand loyal,” and Johnson & Johnson, Disney, P&G, General Mills, Kellogg’s & Nestle all score well for top of mind awareness amongst Hispanics.

Hispanic Millennial Moms are motivated to share for good with other parents and into the world via social media. 46% of hispanic millennial moms want to share good ideas or advice with as large of a community as possible.

However, for advice and information, Hispanic millennial moms mainly turn to family members. 53% looks to her mother and other female family members, 52% to doctors or healthcare professionals and  29% to other moms she is friends with.